Publications

RSC “GUEST ANALYSIS” OFFERS A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF “LAND FOR PEACE” FOR ISRAEL AND KARABAKH

In the seventh article in our “RSC Guest Analysis” publication series, entitled “Land for Peace: A Comparative Analysis of the Cases of Israel and Nagorno-Karabakh,” RSC Resident Fellow Lynette Hacopian offers an innovative comparative assessment of the concept of “land for peace” in the cases of Israel and Nagorno-Karabakh. Hacopian argues that “of the many aspects of the complex Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, the core issues of self determination and territorial integrity have presented a challenging clash or even contradiction of key principles of international law. Within the framework of diplomacy and mediation, there is also a related issue of the need for concession and compromise, largely defined by the surrender of Armenian-held, or ‘occupied,’ territories of Azerbaijan proper beyond the borders of Nagorno-Karabakh, in exchange for the self-determination of Karabakh through a referendum on final status.”

RSC ON SECURITY IMPLICATIONS OF JOINT ARMENIAN-RUSSIAN FORCE COMMAND

The Georgian Institute of Politics published the first issue of their new publication on 1 December 2016, entitled, “What Does the Russian-Armenian Joint Military Force Mean for Security in the South Caucasus?” In the first issue, at the request of the Georgian Institute of Politics, RSC Director Richard Giragosian joined a selection of experts from Italy, Georgia, and the United Kingdom for an analytical comment on the joint military force and its implications for security in the South Caucasus.

http://gip.ge/what-does-the-russian-armenian-joint-military-force-mean-for-security-in-the-south-caucasus/

RSC “GUEST ANALYSIS” ASSESSES THE “UNNATURAL NEXUS” AND “TRIAD OF INTERESTS” AMONG ISRAEL, RUSSIA AND IRAN

In the sixth article in our “RSC Guest Analysis” publication series, entitled “An Unnatural Nexus of Interests: The Israeli-Russian-Iranian Triad,” RSC Resident Fellow Lynette Hacopian presents a unique assessment of the convergence and conflict of interests in Syria and beyond between three major powers: Israel, Russia and Iran. Hacopian argues that in the wake of the Russian military intervention in Syria, the “future of Tehran-Moscow relations will be contingent upon gaining back and maintaining trust between the two countries, and uniting based on their shared interests, provided that a more structured and intensive relationship is established.” She concludes her analysis by noting that “while it is premature to tell where the long-term relationship between Russia and Iran is headed, their shared short-term goals will ensure the continuation of their temporary alliance and active engagement in joint military operations, at least until the power balance in Syria is determined.”

RSC “GUEST ANALYSIS” ASSESSES PROPOSED KARABAKH CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGES

In the fifth article for the “RSC Guest Analysis” publication series, entitled “An Assessment of Proposed Constitutional Changes in Nagorno-Karabakh,” RSC Resident Fellow Alvard Sarsgyan presents a unique assessment of the proposed changes to the Karabakh constitution. Under the terms of the latest version of the set of constitutional amendments, the proposals would effectively endow the Karabakh president with vast powers, and would abolish the post of prime minister. If adopted, the constitutional changes would be the exact reverse of the Armenian model, which adopted its own set of constitutional reforms in December 2015 that usher in a new parliamentary form of governance.

RSC “GUEST ANALYSIS” ON “RUSSIAN-TURKISH RAPPROCHMENT”

In the fourth article for the “RSC Guest Analysis” publication series, entitled “Russian-Turkish rapprochement: Implications for Armenia,” RSC Resident Fellow Alvard Sarsgyan presents an analysis of the recent summit meeting of the Russian and Turkish presidents, representing a new stage in bilateral relations and an apparent end to the conflict between Moscow and Ankara that was sparked by the November 2015 Turkish shoot down of a Russian military jet. A native of Karabakh, Ms. Sargsyan is a graduate student studying International Relations at Yerevan State University and started a six-month Resident Fellowship with the RSC on 1 August 2016.